Tag: photosynthesis

Day 1000: How It Ends

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Inside this cubicle the air is thick as honey, with asphyxiating flecks of the mundane bracing against the irrefutable promise of a golden weekend. Outside these pin-cushion partitions – and indeed inside as well – every tiny molecule in the universe is saying its goodbyes to its neighbors and preparing to splash into the unknown permutations of a distant someday. My fingers hammer at these tiny plastic letters, fully ignorant of what’s to come.

Or are they? The hallowed fingers of esteemed science – no doubt similar in size and shape to my own, only tasked with a far more specific purpose – have combed back the hair of the observable now and picked at the scalp-nits of projection. The fields of astronomy, physics, mathematics, and a cabinet full of –ologies have given us a map of what’s to come. A timeline of time’s last hurrah.

And the best part? If any of these predictions are wrong, every record of them will likely be destroyed before anyone finds out. That’s my kind of science.

Genetics-1

Within 10,000 years, human genetic variation will no longer be regionalized. This won’t mean we’ll all look the same – the blonde gene will still speckle crowds and set up offensive jokes, but it will be distributed equally worldwide. This forecasted panmixia is far more optimistic than astrophysicist Brandon Carter’s Doomsday Argument, which places our present at roughly the halfway point of humankind’s civilized journey, and projects a 95% likelihood that we’ll be wholly extinct in 10,000 years.

If global warming hasn’t already soaked us into a Kevin Costner-esque hellscape by then, we may also be facing the melting of the East Antarctic Ice Sheet, which will raise the sea levels by 3 or 4 meters above wherever it will be once we lose the rest of the polar ice caps, which should happen long before then.

Long term forecast: buy a big-ass boat. Read more…

Day 691: The Downstairs Park

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On a day such as this, when the mercury has given up its climb and packed its full breadth of ooze down below -10 degrees, I feel I should find something to appreciate in this woefully frigid city.

For the few months of the year that allow it, we are privileged to enjoy a serene swath of river valley, as well as a smattering of beautifully-landscaped parks. This means that in over a century of urban development, there have been some scraps of real estate that our councillors have opted not to fill with strip malls and cul-de-sacs. Other cities have been forced to act more creatively, to extract its green space from the bones of its history.

Rail trails are a popular solution – snatching up miles of abandoned track and converting them into miles of cycling, jogging, and someday (hopefully) hoverboarding fun. New York and Paris have vaulted the rail trail concept to include abandoned elevated tracks. Now New York is ready to take things in the next logical direction: straight down.

DeathAvenue

The story of the next phase of the city’s “outdoor” recreation begins here, on a strip of 10th Avenue once known as Death Avenue. The railroads had hired men on horseback – the ‘West Side Cowboys,’ which sounds like the name of a male strip club – to ride in front of the street-level trains to warn people to get the hell out of the way. Still, it was a mess. To clean things up, from 1929 through 1934 New York built a 13-mile elevated railway. It was designed to cut through the middle of city blocks, even running through taller buildings when necessary. Read more…

Bighorn Airways: Avoiding Death By Herring Gull Since 1947

Bighorn Airways bills itself as Wyoming’s largest and most complete Aviation Service Center (caps on those three words come courtesy of the company’s website). At first I didn’t know how many Aviation Service Centers would be competing with Bighorn to be the largest and most complete. I figured this would be like finding the largest and most complete emu wrestling league in Wyoming – there probably aren’t more than two or three.

 I was wrong. I found a few others:

–          Aviat Aircraft Ltd.: Nope, they make planes.

–          Call Air: This company made planes too. Also, they no longer exist.

–          Challenger Airlines: There’s a triumphant story about this airline that braved the winter storms of 1949… but the company merged with a larger one based elsewhere in 1950.

–          Great Lakes Airlines: Great Lakes began in Iowa, is headquartered in Wyoming, and has hubs in Denver, Phoenix, LA and Vegas. None of these places border on any Great Lakes. Maybe this is the more interesting story here.

I stand corrected. The company changed its name from Spirit Lake Airways (named after the town where it was founded) to Great Lakes when it was renamed after the “Great Lakes Region” of northwest Iowa. Again, Iowa is not a state that makes contact with any of the actual Great Lakes. This is like renaming part of Saskatoon the “Seattle District” because they have a Starbucks.

Read more…